Posted in Breaking News, Human Interest, immigration

How TIME came up with the powerful cover “Welcome to America” with Trump and a crying immigrant child

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Screenshot: Time magazine

Time magazine’s latest cover shows the famous image of young Honduran girl sobbing as President Trump is standing over her. The headline reads, “Welcome to America.”

How did Time Magazine come up with this cover?

Karl Vick, Editor at Large at Time magazine told CNN that they knew they had to use the photograph of the girl , because she is an “iconic image.” Vick added,

We call this a photo illustration obviously, because the President has never met her. They just seemed to go together once you put them both on the cover in that dynamic. It captured a lot and then it was the matter of what you say with it.  ‘Welcome to America’ works.

Getty photographer, Jim Moore, took the photo of the little girl crying as border patrol agents patted down her mother. He told CNN earlier in the week that it was a very emotional shoot for him.

Molly Ball is the national political correspondent at Time magazine. In a story that goes with the cover, she writes about Trump,

He thinks shock is a temporary condition, moral outrage is phony posturing and that the American people can be numbed to just about everything.

Vick also told CNN the cover is aimed at Trump’s leadership,

This episode is the country telling the president what we’re about, and what kind of country we are. It’s a role reversal and it’s really quite striking.

The Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” policy has resulted in the separation of parents and children who are taken into federal custody after they are caught crossing the border illegally.

Trump signed an executive order reversing his policy after pressure from politicians and the public. Officials say around 2,300 children are in detention facilities. Young children under six-years-old are being kept in facilities called “Tender Age” shelters. There are reports that several immigrant children are being taken to other parts of the country away from the border and their parents.

SOURCES:

TIME magazine story “The Story Behind TIME’s Trump ‘Welcome to America’ Cover”

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Posted in Breaking News, immigration, Latino Community, Uncategorized

U.S. Catholic Bishops speak out against Trump administration’s policy to separate immigrant families “Children are not instruments of deterrence”

Bishop Daniel Flores and Bishop Joe Vásquez of Texas are telling the world even on  Twitter they are against the Trump administration’s move to separate undocumented parents and their children at the border.

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Bishop Flores tweeted on May 31:

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Twitter Screenshot: Bishop Flores

Separating immigrant parents and children as a supposed deterrent to immigration is a cruel and reprehensible policy. Children are not instruments of deterrence, they are children. A government that thinks any means is suitable to achieve an end cannot secure justice for anyone.

The Trump administration denied for months that there was no formal policy separating families at the border. Their story fell apart and finally they had to come clean that they were separating parents from their children as a deterrent to keep other immigrants from coming to the U.S. illegally.

Read a good background piece by Jonathon Blitzer in The New Yorker. In “How the Trump Administration Got Comfortable Separating Immigrant Kids from Their Parents,” Blitzer writes:

On April 6th, Jeff Sessions and Kirstjen Nielsen, the head of Homeland Security, announced a zero-tolerance policy for immigrants at the border. Anyone who didn’t cross the U.S. border at an official port of entry would be criminally prosecuted, even if they were seeking asylum, and those travelling with their children would be separated from them. The policy was now official, and the Administration acknowledged its rationale: it was separating families to discourage others from travelling to the United States illegally

What was the policy before? Politifacts reports:

Before the Trump administration, immigrants entering illegally as families were rarely prosecuted, said Sarah Pierce, an associate policy analyst of the U.S. Immigration Program at the Migration Policy Institute. Instead, immigrants were held in family detention centers until they were sent to appear before an immigration court or deported.

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Bishop Joe Vásquez, the Chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ (USCCB) Committee on Migration, issued a statement on June 1:

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Photo Courtesy: Bob Roller, CNS

Forcibly separating children from their mothers and fathers is ineffective to the goals of deterrence and safety and contrary to our Catholic values. Family unity is a cornerstone of our American immigration system and a foundational element of Catholic teaching. ‘Children are a gift from the Lord, the fruit of the womb, a reward.’ (Psalm 127:3) Children are not instruments of deterrence but a blessing from God.

Rupturing the bond between parent and child causes scientifically proven trauma that often leads to irreparable emotional scarring. Accordingly, children should always be placed in the least restrictive setting: a safe, family environment, ideally with their own families.

My brother bishops and I understand the need for the security of our borders and country, but separating arriving families at the U.S./Mexico border does not allay security concerns. Children and families will continue to take the enormous risks of migration—including family separation—because the root causes of migration from the Northern Triangle remain: community or state-sanctioned violence, gang recruitment, poverty, and a lack of educational opportunity. Any policies should address these factors first as we seek to repair our broken immigration system.

The New Yorker reports that according to the Department of Homeland Security, 658 children were separated from their parents between May 6th and May 19th.

 

Other stories of interest:

Houston Chronicle: Immigrant Families Separated at Border Struggle to Find Each Other

Posted in Breaking News, immigration, Latino Community, Uncategorized

Politico, immigrants are people not commodities, ‘Get your own immigrant’ story insulting and insensitive

Give two professors time to come up with a ridiculous answer to the U.S. immigration issue, and you’ll get what Politico Magazine has just published.

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Screenshot: Politico

The headline said it all, “What If You Could Get Your Own Immigrant?”

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Eric Posner

Eric Posner, a Chicago law professor and Glen Weyl, a Yale professor think immigrants should be matched with Americans who need cheap labor. Their idea is to have an  international website where Americans can find an immigrant they can sponsor in exchange the immigrant can live in a basement and get paid $5 dollars an hour for work.

Can we say indentured servitude?

I am a fan of many reporters who work for Politico, but it is shocking that this article got by several gatekeepers at the magazine.

Do you really think immigrants should be treated basically like slaves? Do you really think they should live in a basement?

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Glen Weyl

Sure, some could say an immigrant can turn down the job, but still…live in basement? That’s how these professors think we should treat newcomers. How heartless!

Shame on Posner and Weyl who proved they think immigrants are commodities. Why not use your knowledge on “an idea” that can help immigrants live a decent life in the United States and be treated with respect?

Also shame on Blake Hounshell, Politico Magazine’s editor-in-chief who gave these guys a platform to insult the immigrant community. He also tweeted the story early because he was proud of it.

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Screenshot: Hounshell Twitter 

This is why more people of color are needed in managerial positions in newsrooms. I would love to know how many editors are Hispanic at Politico Magazine. If I was an editor at Politico this story would have been tossed out.

As the daughter of immigrants, I can’t imagine my parents shoved in a basement and paid five bucks an hour to feed their kids.  As a journalist, I am ashamed that an editor would look at this story and not realize it only encourages people to look at immigrants as property not as people.

No matter how you feel about immigrants, whether here legally or not, they still deserve respect.

As I was writing this blog, Politico changed the headline. They are getting backlash on social media for the story and the headline.  Now it reads “Sponsor an Immigrant Yourself.”

Too late the damage has been done.

Posted in Breaking News, Human Interest, immigration, Journalism Education

Albuquerque Journal accused of publishing ‘racist’ cartoon about Dreamers, decision also hurt reputable columnists and reporters

The Albuquerque Journal is feeling the public’s hate. Many are threatening a protest in front of the newspaper’s building and readers are cancelling their subscriptions.

Wednesday, the newspaper published a cartoon that many are calling “racist.” The Executive Director of the New Mexico LULAC Council said on Facebook “The comic portrays three youths dressed as thugs and terrorists and the caption reads ‘Now, Honey…I believe they prefer to be called ‘DREAMERS’…or future Democrats…”

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Facebook Screenshot

The newspaper has been bombarded with hate emails, social media posts and more. Unfortunately also hurt by the publishing of this syndicated cartoon are the good reporters and columnists at the paper.

One of them is columnist, Joline Gutierrez Krueger. She had nothing to do with management’s decision to put the controversial cartoon in the Journal, but she is also being attacked for it. Here is what she shared on Facebook:

 

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Facebook Screenshot

 

Joline told me  “This has been probably the roughest time I have ever dealt with, and I get criticism all the time.”

As I was writing this blog, Karen Moses, the editor-in-chief of the Journal issued an apology.

Political cartoons are often satire and poke at more than one point of view. I do not presume to know what cartoonist Sean Delonas was trying to convey in his cartoon that was published in Wednesday’s Albuquerque Journal. But on one level it appeared to us to be poking at President Trump’s rhetoric by portraying a quaking Republican couple who were painting Dreamers with a broad, totally false, brush.

Obviously, that was not the message received by many readers. Instead, many saw an extremely objectionable cartoon and thought that was the position of the Journal. It is not.

In hindsight, instead of generating debate, this cartoon only inflamed emotions. This was not the intent, and for that, the Journal apologizesAlbuquerque-Journal-logo

In my opinion, Ms. Moses needs to apologize to her staff, especially the reporters and columnists who are out on the streets dealing with people face-to-face.

One more thing. I’m not sure how many Latinos work at the Albuquerque Journal, but next time ask one of them if a cartoon like this would be perceived as “racist.” I know if I was in that newsroom I would have said “Don’t publish it!”

 

 

Posted in Breaking News, Cesar Chavez, Human Interest, immigration, Latino Community

Dallas Mega Marchers show commitment to unity and push for immigration reform

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Photo courtesy: DPD

The Dallas Mega March did not draw the 100-thousand people that organizers expected, but the ones who did show up were just as passionate as the ones in 2006. That’s when 500,000 marchers took to the streets of Dallas.

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Photos by Rebecca Aguilar 

Ashley of Sherman, Texas was at the rally in front of Dallas City Hall with a sign that read “Got White Privilege?” She thought it was important to take her little boy to the Mega March on Sunday, because she said it was history.

Thousands at the rally waved signs, some read “Will trade racists for refugees” and “Keep hope alive.” Dallas police estimated around 32-hundred people marched on Sunday.

I did a Facebook Live while I was there and walked through the crowd. People of different backgrounds, ages, and religions were there to show their support.