Posted in Breaking News, Discrimination, women's rights

Big win for mothers, EEOC finds North Texas bar liable for pregnancy discrimination

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The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has settled a pregnancy discrimination lawsuit against Off the Air, II, Inc., which does business as Nick’s Sports Grill, a sports bar in Rowlett, Texas.

The EEOC says Off the Air will pay $24,000 to a former female bartender.

An EEOC investigation revealed Taylor King was forced to leave her job after she changed the bar’s mandatory wardrobe to something different. Nick’s requires female bartenders and waitresses to wear hot pants and tight tops. King who was pregnant decided to change her wardrobe to something more comfortable. She replaced her hot pants with Capri pants, and wore loser tops.

The EEOC says a General Manager told King the owner would not like what she was wearing and that’s when she was asked to leave. King filed a complaint with the EEOC.

The lawsuit settlement also requires the bar owners to:

  • Pay a $24,000 financial settlement to King.
  • Prohibit future discrimination and retaliation for complaining about it.
  • Disseminate specific parts of its employee handbook to all employees.
  • Provide annual training on pregnancy and other forms of discrimination.
  • Report all complaints of discrimination to the EEOC as agreed as part of three-year settlement.
  • Impose discipline up to termination on any manager who discriminates based on sex or permits such conduct to occur under his or her supervision.
  • Post a notice on employee bulletin boards about the decree, explaining procedures for reporting discrimination.

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EEOC Trial Attorney Toby Wosk Costas says…

Even bars and clubs with provocative uniforms cannot discriminate by using the dress code requirement to oust a pregnant employee…When the short, tight outfit no longer worked, Taylor King no longer had a job. She could have continued to work at Nick’s had she not become pregnant. Under civil rights laws, that’s pregnancy discrimination, which is a form of discrimination based on sex.

Taylor King, the former bartender had the last word.

Just because you look different as a pregnant woman, it doesn’t mean you can’t do your job. I want people to know that if you feel you are being discriminated against, you should do something about it.

MY OPINION, YES I HAVE ONE 

Taylor King is a brave woman. Now her bravery has changed the way pregnant employees are treated at bars and restaurants where they are required to wear sexy clothes on the job.

Her discrimination lawsuit should also teach male bosses to have more compassion for pregnant women, and realize they want to work.

Also kudos to the EEOC that is always fighting to rid the world of discrimination.

IF YOU ARE BEING DISCRIMINATED, FILE A COMPLAINT

If you believe that you have been discriminated against at work because of your race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, gender identity, and sexual orientation), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information, you can file a Charge of Discrimination. A charge of discrimination is a signed statement asserting that an employer, union or labor organization engaged in employment discrimination. It requests EEOC to take remedial action. >>Filed a Complaint.

Source: EEOC Press Release

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Posted in Inspirational, News Now, women's rights

Photos of Empowerment of Women and Girls in India and the U.S.

One photo can tell you the strength of a woman. Can you imagine what 300 can do?

More than 300 high-quality photos are being shared with the public. The images are of women and girls in two regions of the world: Bihar, India and Louisiana and Mississippi in the United States. It’s a positive look into their lives and what they are doing in their communities.

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Screenshot: Images of Empowerment

The photos are available on an online photo database thanks to the partnership between the David and Lucile Packard FoundationGetty Images, a world leader in visual communications, and The Verbatim Agency.

The collection gives a positive look into the lives of women and girls who are located in different parts of the world. What they have in common are their leadership qualities. They are in decision-making roles, accessing and providing quality reproductive health care and are actively involved in their communities.

All the photos were taken by two world-renowned women photographers, Nina Robinson and Paula Bronstein.

Each photo tells a story. Look at all 300 images. Go to >> Online Data Base

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Screenshot: Images of Empowerment

 

FEEDBACK ON PROJECT

Christopher Cox, Director of Youth Programs for Teen Health Mississippi said,

It is inspiring to hear the stories of these young women and to see them in action by way of the Raise Her Voice collection

Aidan Sullivan, CEO, Verbatim added

The potential of imagery to provoke conversation and drive change is unquestionable.

 

SOURCES

The David and Lucile Packard Foundation

To view and download the new Images of Empowerment photos, available under Creative Commons licensing: visit www.imagesofempowerment.org/Bihar for images from the Bihar region of India; visit www.imagesofempowerment.org/UnitedStates for images from Louisiana and Mississippi in the southern United States. To read the photo essay, Raising Her Voice, visit www.packard.org/2018/03/raising-her-voice.

Posted in Breaking News, Sexual Harassment, women's rights

TIME’S UP unites women against sexual assault, harassment, and inequality in the workplace, and raises 15 million dollars for legal fund

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It feels good to see women unite on different fronts. Now we start 2018 with a new movement called TIME’S UP. More than 300 women, many well-known, united to start this mission.  The TIME’S UP website explains the why:

 

The clock has run out on sexual assault, harassment and inequality in the workplace. It’s time to do something about it.

 

This isn’t just women of Hollywood. This movement is involving women from all backgrounds and workplaces, from actresses to female farm workers.

 

TIME’S UP is a unified call for change from women in entertainment for women everywhere. From movie sets to farm fields to boardrooms alike, we envision nationwide leadership that reflects the world in which we live.

 

TIME’S UP is also creating a fund to help women fight back legally.  Here’s a link to the TIME’s UP Legal Defense Fund. >>Fund. The goal is 15 million dollars.

 

Powered by women, TIME’S UP addresses the systemic inequality and injustice in the workplace that have kept underrepresented groups from reaching their full potential. We partner with leading advocates for equality and safety to improve laws, employment agreements, and corporate policies; help change the face of corporate boardrooms and the C-suite; and enable more women and men to access our legal system to hold wrongdoers accountable

 

LETTER TO “DEAR SISTERS”

 

 

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“Dear Sisters” is the organizer’s message and goals. They also gave credit to the women who work the farm fields.

Alianza Nacional de Campesinas’ members are Latina farm workers. They wrote a letter of solidarity in November to Hollywood men and women who had step forward to expose the sexual harassment they had experienced.  Here is part of their letter published in Time magazine: 

 

We wish that we could say we’re shocked to learn that this is such a pervasive problem in your industry. Sadly, we’re not surprised because it’s a reality we know far too well. Countless farmworker women across our country suffer in silence because of the widespread sexual harassment and assault that they face at work.

 

TIME’S UP WEBSITE RESOURCES CAN HELP YOU NOW

Check out the website TIME’S UP has put together. It has many resources and facts:

1. Know your Rights

2. What to do

3. TIME’s UP Legal Defense Fund 

 

Create change for all women in 2018.

Join TIME’S UP with your voice and financial support. Happy 2018!